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New York State Lawmakers Pass Bill to Repeal 50-A Law That Conceals Police Records

Photo: Unsplash @JulianWan

June 10, 2020 By Allie Griffin

New York state lawmakers passed a bill yesterday to repeal a law that cloaks police records in secrecy.

The lawmakers overwhelming voted in favor of the bill to repeal the law known as 50-A, as calls for police reforms are sweeping the nation. The bill disbands the decades-old law that seals police officers’ personnel records from public viewing.

The NYPD has been accused of using 50-A to hide the disciplinary and misconduct records of its officers from the public. The old law states that performance records of police officers, firefighters and correction officers are “confidential and not subject to inspection or review.”

Police reform advocates have been pushing for its repeal for years to improve transparency and accountability inside the NYPD. The protests in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd pushed the vote forward.


The bill passed with a 40-22 vote in the senate and a 101-43 vote in the assembly.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has said he supports the repeal of 50-A and will sign the bill into law this week.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

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Capt. Obvious

Lets hope NYPD fights to repeal the NYS Taylor law. Cause the City of NY has an unfair advantage when it comes to contract negations.
Not all police are bad. A shame a few bad ones messed it up for others.

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