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Man Pleads Guilty for JFK Cargo Heist After Being Found With Gucci And Chanel Products Worth Millions

Designer items recovered by police last year following a court-authorized search of a stash house in Jamaica Queens  (Photo: Queens DA)

Sept. 15, 2021 By Christian Murray

A Manhattan man who was part of a crew involved in a $4 million cargo heist at JFK Airport last year pleaded guilty Tuesday to criminal possession of stolen goods.

David Lacarriere, 34, pleaded guilty for his role in a brazen May 17, 2020, theft—where he and his crew used forged air cargo receipts to steal Gucci and Chanel designer gear from a warehouse on JFK Airport grounds.

The thieves, according to the Queens District Attorney’s office, took handbags, jewelry, ready-to-wear clothes, sneakers, and other expensive accessories.

“The safety and security of Queens County’s airports are a top priority for my Office,” said Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz in a statement. “Teaming up with our law enforcement partners, we relentlessly pursued those responsible for this audacious heist – catching them red-handed with more than $2 million dollars’ worth [of the $4 million] of stolen property.”

Lacarriere is expected to be sentenced on Oct. 26 to 5 ½ to 11 years in prison.

Several people were arrested for their involvement in the heist, with Lacarriere viewed as a ringleader. He formerly worked at JFK Airport as a truck driver.

According to the charges, a member of Lacarriere’s crew impersonated a truck driver and presented forged documents to gain access to a cargo import-export facility at the airport. The thieves then drove away with a shipment of designer merchandise.

Port Authority Police found the trailer more than a week later on 56th Road in Maspeth. The trailer contained shipping pallets and wrapping material–but was essentially empty.

Investigators, utilizing cell technology and video footage, traced Lacarriere and his crew to a non-operational beauty salon in Jamaica, Queens—called Candi World Beauty Bar– believed to be used as a stash house for the stolen goods.

The police executed a court-authorized search warrant for the location and found boxes of stolen merchandise that included Gucci and Chanel products valued at more than $2 million. Lacarriere was busted after being found hiding in a closet.

Katz said the safety of passengers and cargo at the airports in Queens is a priority.

“Our airports must be safe for travelers. JFK Airport, an international trade hub, must also be secure for companies that transport vital air cargo to our region—especially during the height of this healthcare pandemic.”

email the author: news@queenspost.com
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