You are reading

Kew Gardens Interchange Project Finally Completed After a Decade of Construction

Construction taking place last year at the Kew Gardens Interchange (Photo: Christina Santucci/Queens Post)

Dec. 6, 2022 By Max Murray

The decade-long project to overhaul the Kew Gardens Interchange, long known for its congestion and tangled web of roadways, has been completed.

Gov. Kathy Hochul announced Monday the completion of the $739 million Kew Gardens Interchange project, marking the conclusion of a multi-phase undertaking by New York State to revamp the heavily traveled commuter corridor.

The Kew Gardens Interchange is the complex intersection of the Grand Central Parkway, the Van Wyck Expressway, the Jackie Robinson Parkway and Union Turnpike, that serves nearly 600,000 vehicles daily. In the past, major deficiencies throughout the interchange contributed to congestion and higher than average accident rates.

The project, which took 12 years to complete, addressed a number of key challenges stemming from the structural and operational deficiencies of the old infrastructure.

“The transformation of this vital interchange near one of New York’s major airports is the latest accomplishment in our efforts to modernize the state’s transportation network,” Hochul said in a statement. “The complete overhaul of Kew Gardens Interchange will provide a safer, less congested network of roads…enhancing the quality of life [for commuters] and boosting the regional economy for decades to come.”

The revamped Kew Gardens Interchange allows for faster travel times, safer merging and exiting, and more reliable connections for the hundreds of thousands of commuters, travelers and local businesses who use it daily to reach the John F. Kennedy International Airport and other key destinations throughout the region.

It features 22 new bridges, three rehabilitated bridges, wider travel lanes, new lane configurations, updated signage, upgraded stormwater drainage, and a new dedicated shared use path for pedestrians and bicyclists.

The project, which involved several phases, began in 2010, with officials at the time recognizing the interchange’s many deficiencies.

“The Kew Gardens Interchange is one of the most tangled knots of congestion in all of New York City, impacting the economy of the city and affecting the quality of life of all Queens residents,” said Stanley Gee, who was the acting NYS DOT Commissioner, in 2010. “The New York State Department of Transportation has worked with elected officials and community members to develop a plan that will untangle the knots, providing a smooth, safe flow of commuters and commerce in Queens.”

The plan was finally completed yesterday, with local officials welcoming the end of construction.

“The completion of this multi-stage project brings brand new travel infrastructure to this vital roadway,” said State Sen. Joseph Addabbo in a statement. “By making these roads easier and safer to travel — for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians alike — it will benefit commuters who use these roads every day as well as those traveling through our city.”

email the author: [email protected]
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Op-ed: An urgent call for revising NY’s criminal justice reforms to protect public safety

Apr. 11, 2024 By Council Member Robert Holden

In 2019, the State Legislature and Governor Andrew Cuomo embarked on a controversial overhaul of New York’s criminal justice system by enacting several laws, including cashless bail and sweeping changes to discovery laws. Simultaneously, the New York City Council passed laws that compounded these challenges, notably the elimination of punitive segregation in city jails and qualified immunity for police officers. These actions have collectively undermined public safety and constrained law enforcement effectiveness.

Young man sought for scrawling swastika on an SUV in Middle Village: NYPD

The NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is now looking for a suspect who allegedly drew a swastika on an SUV in Middle Village late last month.

Police from the 104th Precinct in Ridgewood reported that on the afternoon of Saturday, Mar. 30, an unidentified man approached a Honda Pilot parked in front of a home at 66-65 70th St., just north of All Saints Cemetery and drew the swastika on the rear bumper of the vehicle at around 5:45 p.m..

City employee charged in fatal collision that killed a Middle Village woman in Elmhurst last month: NYPD

A truck driver for the city’s Department of Environmental Protection was arrested and charged in a fatal collision in Elmhurst last month.

Roderick Mitchell, 38, of Valley Stream, Long Island, turned himself in at the 110th Precinct in Elmhurst, where he was charged with failure to yield and failure to exercise due care for striking 43-year-old Natalia Garcia-Valencia of Middle Village on the morning of Tuesday, Mar. 12.