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74-Year-Old Pedestrian Killed in Ridgewood Hit-and-Run Sunday: NYPD

(Photo Citizen)

A 74-year-old man is dead after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in Ridgewood Sunday night (Photo: Citizen)

Aug. 15, 2022 By Michael Dorgan

A 74-year-old man is dead after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in Ridgewood Sunday.

The victim, Be Tran, was hit as he attempted to cross the intersection of Myrtle Avenue and Hancock Street at around 7:40 p.m., according to police.

The driver, who was in a black-colored BMW, was traveling eastbound on Myrtle Avenue when he plowed into Tran. The driver fled the scene southbound on Seneca Avenue, police said.

Tran, of 58th Road in Flushing, was hit as he attempted to cross on Myrtle Avenue. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

There have been no arrests and the investigation remains ongoing.

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111thevoice

My daughter and I heard the loud impact. It was so loud she thought 2 cars crashed. We ran up to our roof with my cellphone ready to record but not expecting to see a person just lying on the ground. It was truly heartbreaking to see an emt bring out the blanket and cover him up. I don’t know why they left the scene open to be viewed by all the passerby. I saw their reaction at seeing a white blanket with blood seeping through, it was horrible. I hope that driver is caught and locked up for many years. Mr. Tran seems like a loving family man. My condolences to his family.

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